Algeria - Diplomatic Missions

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Foreign Embassies in Algeria

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Algeria was last updated 1 year ago.

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  1. April 6, 2022 at 11:46 AM
    profile photo
    sue-richards says:

    First I would like to thank you for you excellent site and base of knowledge!
    I started a sailing sabbatical on my Oceanis 43 in September 2020 and did a passage from Montenegro to Melilla (with an emergency stop in Skikda, Algeria).
    We called the Coastguard on the VHF but they didn’t respond. Only when we called Skikda port control approx. 5 miles out, did the Coastguard respond. We explained that we wanted to check an issue with the rudder and they told us that they would call us back in a few minutes.

    They called us back and told us we were welcome to come into Skikda commercial port. I would like to mention that at this time Algeria was pretty much closed due to Covid. The Harbormaster called us shortly after and also welcomed us to the port. We even got a pilot boat to show us the way in.

    Once on the quay, we got checked in by Coastguard, Medical service (Covid time), Police and Customs. It wasn’t a problem at all that we didn’t have a visa (of course as it was an unplanned stop) and even my co-skippers Passport being expired wasn’t a problem. Everybody was very nice and kind.

    The harbormaster brought us breakfast to the boat the next morning as a gift. We checked our rudder and found everything ok. Spent another night and left the next morning.

    The only thing was that it was almost impossible to get Diesel. We would have needed an agent and it would have been very complicated, so we decided to move on with what we still had (as our Ema is a sailboat, right 😉)

    Michael
    SV Ema

  2. May 31, 2020 at 8:22 PM
    dd-skysail says:

    i sail all Algeria in end 2019, without visa , but no problem, the algerian people are really friendly, you can see an youtube my travel https://youtu.be/MuMkOslSZPs
    go and visit algeria you will like it

  3. October 11, 2019 at 1:34 PM
    cornelis says:

    Is it possible to just stop at the fuel dock, taking in 10K litre of diesel and leave without the whole papershop hassle ?

  4. October 4, 2018 at 11:56 PM
    Lynda Lim says:

    We are currently sailing in Algeria (Sep./Oct. 2018).

    Language : Arabic is spoken by everyone, french almost the same, but with a limited vocabulary, English not a lot…

    Formalities :
    Be patient, they are usually very nice, but numerous and it takes time.
    Have a photocopier or a phone+small printer on board.
    This way you will have in advance copies of all required docs.
    They usually require copies of passports, copies of visas, boat registration doc, boat insurance certificate, your skippers licence and radio operator licence.
    Call harbour a few miles before arrival and request permission to enter.
    Sometimes you will be allowed to go to your berth, sometimes they will ask you to make a quick stop by the coast-guard office.
    Have an Algerian flag. Have a Q flag. Have your national flag.
    Officials will come to your boat : up to 6 different teams : port control, coast guard, police, immigration, customs, …
    Visas are highly recommended as it significantly shortens the procedures.
    Visas can be tough to obtain, as they require an invitation, which obviously you won’t have. Explain, insist, … you’ll get it !
    Diesel is cheap (about 0.17 €/l)
    Ports are safe, as you usually have a policeman 24/7 watching the boat and you.
    Ports are not meant for cruisers : you will be in the commercial port, dirty, …
    Especially if you have a visa, getting to town is allowed, sometimes witch a policeman watching you.

    Tenes : small town, great market, port was free.
    Mostaganem : avoid !!! Dirty, dirty, and a “gift” which I refused to pay : 24000 DA (210€) for one night. I lowered to 6000… City is big, with special interest.
    Oran : as always, no berth for sailboat, so installed between cargoes… worth a visit in town.
    Moorings not recommended ; not many places for moorings, coast is very straight in general.

  5. February 14, 2018 at 12:34 PM
    Data Entry3 says:

    Posted on behalf of Jan Harzem

    Fly the Algerian courtesy flag
    The coast guard will call you on VHF16 as you approach Algerian waters, asking your intentions.
    You will be a novelty and will be treated as such, everybody will want to talk to you and take selfies on your yacht. Best to be strict and say a polite no thank you.

    You can expect the formalities to take at least an hour or so. You will see the Coast Guard first, usually at the entrance to the port, they will wave you down and ask you to tie up at their wharf. You will have to fill in some paperwork. Best is if you have copies of passports, ship registration documents. insurance and your sailing qualifications at hand. Next, is police and Customs, depending on location. Whoever is the senior of all three, will run the show. They are extremely courteous and helpful, but will do a cursory search of the vessel. You will have to provide a Customs declaration and declare currency etc, The Police will retain your passports, which you will get back upon leaving. Sometimes the Harbourmaster and the quarantine doctor will come and see you, but really only out of curiosity.

    If you want to leave the port area and do not have a visa, you need to ask for a permit d’escale, which is usually granted and you will be escorted into town by police in civilian clothes. In our case we were driven into town to change money and then taken for a scenic tour to the town and surrounding country side. Diesel is Dinar 23 per litre equivalent to Euro 0.18 per liter.
    It helps if you speak some French, but a lot of the officials will be able to speak English as well.

  6. November 15, 2015 at 11:29 PM
    Data Entry3 says:

    Most important thing: have Algerian courtesy flag onboard. Even if you are just passing by – in case of entering their harbour in emergency. They will not let you just buy it in the first port. I’ve just had an full blown court case two weeks ago in Tenes because of that. They will give you penalty between 200 and 1000EUR (I was lucky – only 200EUR).
    Just in case – harbourmaster and his men are your best friends. Immigration – greedy and corrupted. Customs – neutral. Coastguard – mostly ok, except the one that started whole thing. Maybe it was just a bad luck we’ve entered the port on his shift. According to their procedures after being sentenced you have to spend there 10 days before you can pay the fine and then leave.