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By No owner — last modified Dec 19, 2012 11:16 AM

 Seychelles - Profile

Facts

  • An outbreak of Foot and Mouth disease in Reunion and Rodrigues in 2016 has resulted in strict food import restrictions. See this Noonsite report.
  • The Seychelles number over 100 islands, some granite, others coral atolls including one of the world's largest atolls, Aldabra. This is now a world heritage site and permission to visit it must be obtained in Mahé. Having been uninhabited by man until 200 years ago, the islands are rich in unique wildlife, such as the giant land tortoise, many species of birds, strange plants such as the giant Coco de Mer, and untouched forests.
  • Mahé, La Digue and Praslin have all been developed for foreign visitors to enjoy these natural advantages, but the number of tourists is kept controlled.
  • The best anchorages are on Mahé. The outlying island anchorages are very exposed and subject to uncomfortable cross-swell conditions. The anchorages at La Digue and Praslin Islands are particularly striking and one of the chief attractions on the latter is Baie St Anne, with its thousands of Coco de Mer palms, some of them reputedly 800 years old.
  • The strict controls imposed on cruising yachts in the early 1990s have been gradually lifted and formalities are no longer so complicated, although some restrictions remain in force. Most of these are meant to protect this truly unique environment.
  • With the increase in the number of cruising yachts visiting the Seychelles and also because some charter boats are based there, facilities are steadily improving. All repair services are concentrated in Victoria, where there are several boatyards with slipways. Two new marinas have opened on Mahe, as bases for charter operations but with facilities available to visiting yachts.
  • There are also limited facilities on Praslin and La Digue.

Security

Sadly crime, such as opportunist theft, has increased in the Seychelles in recent years and normal security precautions should be taken as with elsewhere.

Cruisers report in 2018 that burglaries are becoming more common in multiple locations throughout the islands (see comments posted at bottom of page).

In 2015 a number of boats were boarded at night at anchor in the inner yacht basin in Port Victoria, Mahe. All times it was by swimmers (possibly the same men every time) who stole whatever they could lay their hands on. The one time they were confronted by the yacht crew, the situation turned violent. See report here.

Local Police recommend cruisers lock their boats at night, lock and lift their dinghies and check their outside decks for anything that can be used as a weapon against them.

Last updated:  May 2018

Weather

The climate is tropical, but outside of the cyclone belt. Temperatures average 75-86°F (24-30°C). The NW monsoon lasts from November to April, while from March it is hotter and the winds are lighter until the SE monsoon sets in from May to October.

Weather forecasts are available by calling Seychelles Radio (Coast Station) on VHF channel 16 (working channel 26).

Seychelles Weather Forecast.

For links to free global weather information, forecast services and extreme weather information see the Noonsite Weather Page.

Main Ports

Mahe: Port Victoria (Mahe) *

The Inner Islands: Inner Islands

The Outer Islands: Outer Islands

* indicates port of entry

Robbie
Robbie says:
Jun 09, 2018 03:14 AM

Seychelles General Info June 2018
We visited the Republic of Seychelles April until July 2018 and would like to share, in no particular order, observations that may be useful to other yacht owners crossing the Indian Ocean.

1. Visiting Seychelles is not as expensive as we were led to believe. There is a fee for checking into the country, but it’s less than we’ve paid in many other places, around US$20.00. There are fees payable each time one checks in and checks out of Victoria Port, but it is not necessary to check in and check out each time the vessel returns to Victoria for provisions unless one wishes to anchor in the inner harbor. There are other suitable places to anchor without incurring fees. It is possible to visit many of the “inner islands,” the granitic islands around Victoria, without paying National Parks mooring fees. Those fees are approx. US$15 per night, the marine park perimeters are clearly marked by large white buoys, and there are plenty of lovely anchorages outside the park boundaries. Upon arrival one receives a free 30-day visitor permit, which is renewable for an additional 60 days at no charge. A further extension is expensive at approx. US$360 per person. In our first month in Seychelles, we paid less than US$125 in fees including check-in formalities, park fees and mooring fees.

2. Restaurants and bars are very expensive and creole cuisine is far less impressive than that of India or Southeast Asia, so we eat most of our meals on board as do other cruisers in Seychelles. Most resorts serve mediocre buffet meals to their guests as part of an all-inclusive accommodation plan. Those who welcome outside guests, and many do not, charge very high prices for the buffet. A good cocktail in a nice establishment can cost US$20.00. If you like to eat all your meals in tourist-oriented restaurants you will find Seychelles exorbitantly expensive. If you like spicy flavours you will be disappointed. A bottle of Seybrew, the local beer, served at Marine Charter or the SYC, costs US$2.20. The same beer will cost up to US$10.00 at a resort or at a restaurant with ambiance. Local eateries are more modestly priced and generally of average quality.

3. Anchoring is very slightly restricted. We came prepared with detailed information on where to find the few mooring buoys installed by the Marine Parks and Tourism Board, the limitations for their use, the associated fees, and fines for overstaying the 1-night limit. In fact, there are no mooring buoys at all for public use anywhere around the inner islands. No one monitors the length of time a yacht remains in one place and no one comes to collect any kind of fees except in the National Marine Parks where overnight anchorage (no moorings) costs less than US$15.00. Pleasant and courteous park rangers come to your yacht to collect fees if you overnight in a Marine Park. There are strict prohibitions against anchoring in some locations clearly expressed in the helpful information packet given to us by officials at the time we checked in. However yachts anchor freely in those places without penalty and without time restriction. These mooring/no anchoring policies may have been a good idea and may have been enforced in the past, but the moorings simply don’t exist and the restrictions are universally ignored by both yachties and officials. Only the National Marine Park regulations are enforced and even there one may anchor as long as desired at a rate of US$15.00 per day.

4. The information packet provided upon arrival is comprehensive and helpful, but it fails to inform yacht owners that they must apply for temporary importation of the yacht at the expiration of the initial 1-month visitor permit. We did not understand this and only learned of the regulation from another yacht owner who had made the same mistake. Upon submission of the proper forms to the Customs Inland Revenue Department temporary import is generally granted, together with a firm lecture and possibly a fine. You’d think this would be explained in the 20-page information packet, but it is not even mentioned.

5. There is an excellent shipyard in Victoria, Taylor Smith Shipyard, which has been in operation for about 4 years. It’s run very professionally, management and most of the skilled tradesmen have been hired from outside Seychelles and quality work, though expensive, can be expected. The yard has a 150 ton Travelift, plans to buy a larger one, and can lift just about anything, including large catamarans.

6. We are sorry to report that security is a problem in Seychelles. Our yacht was burglarized during the night while we were asleep at anchor, our own fault for leaving the companionway open in the hot weather. We know of three or four other yachts that were burglarized in the same way in recent months. Thefts occur at multiple locations. The thief approached our yacht in a stolen sailing dinghy.

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