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Aruba: New Customs’ Rules - Update

By Sue Richards last modified Oct 11, 2012 12:16 PM
New procedure for foreign registered yachts to be applied from 1 October 2012.

Published: 2012-10-11 00:00:00
Countries: Aruba

Our thanks to Jean-Charles Bellemare, who reported the following on October 11, 2012:

The form to fill to comply with the new rule - if your boat stays less than 180 days in Aruba - is the C507-C5. The form is in Dutch only. You can fill the form in yourself or use a broker/agent.

The actual fee for using an agent/broker (we used S.E.L. Maduro and Sons) was US$25 or 45ANG. So the information of 60$ to 100$ is not correct. There is no other fee.

The Customs Authorities are talking about modifying the rule. According to the modification, yachts in transit in Aruba for less than 5 days won't have to proceed with a temporary importation - HOWEVER THIS IS NOT OFFICIAL YET. Yachtsin transit for less than 5 days should ask about the modification.

Aruba: New Customs’ Rules - Published 19 September, 2012

It has now been confirmed that outside of the regular clearance procedure; as of October 1, 2012 a new procedure for foreign registered yachts will be applied by the customs office of Aruba. This means that, outside of the regular clearance upon arrival, you will also have to declare the vessel you are on. This will not need to be done upon arrival but can be done (no later than) the next day. For this you will need to use a customs broker. The customs broker will have to start the process of the declaration no later than your second day on the island. Cost will be about US$ 65.00 to US$ 100.00 (see actual fees above).

Varadero Caribe has started to offer dry storage and is in the process of applying for an entrepot status where there will be an exemption of this rule for yachts left on the hard.

THE RULES:

  • If the yacht stays 180 days or less: A temporary import permit will need to be obtained. No deposit will be required.

  • If the yacht stays longer than 180 days up to a year: A temporary import permit will need to be obtained with payment of a deposit (or a bank guarantee) for the value of the duties for the yacht.

  • At the expiration of the temporary permit the yacht will have to leave the island for at least 15 days before a new temporary permit can be applied for.

  • If the yacht will stay longer than a year the yacht will have to be imported.

  • Yachts brought into Aruba with the intention of sale will have to pay duties upon arrival.

The Customs Broker will have to start the process of the declaration no later than your second day on the island. The Broker's fee will be between US$ 65 and US$ 100.

For more information visit: www.Aruba-cruisingguide.com.

Our thanks to Sander Vellinga of East Wind Marine Services and Jean-Claude Rambert of SY Indigo III for bringing this announcement to noonsite's attention.

See history of this new rule below.

Aruba: Update on Proposed New Customs’ Rules - 28 August 2012

After meetings with concerned parties who might be affected by the proposed new regulations, Aruba Customs have indicated they will not be enforcing this regulation until further study can be undertaken.

So for now, things are back to normal in Aruba and visiting yachts need not import their boats temporarily upon arrival.

Aruba: New customs’ rules for private aircrafts and pleasure yachts — 20 August 2012

As from October 1st new rules will be introduced for private aircrafts and pleasure yachts staying on Aruba for a short period. From that date a private aircraft or pleasure yacht must submit a written report for temporary import upon arrival. Customs announced this yesterday.

A temporary import document regards the private aircraft or pleasure yacht in question and serves as a guarantee or security for import duty and possibly other taxes. Temporary import documents must be drawn up in the name of persons owning or operating the private aircraft or pleasure yacht. The temporary import makes a distinction between private aircrafts or pleasure yachts staying on Aruba for 90 days or less, or staying longer than 90 days. For the first group, (90 days or less), a report for temporary import is made without security, while the report regarding the second group includes security. The security equals the amount on import duties. The fuel, lubricants and provision from a private aircraft or pleasure yacht are exempted from import duties in the case of temporary import. In this case customs assume that the fuel tanks have a normal capacity and are linked to the engine.

With a definite import, the payment of import duties occurs in accordance with the prevailing stipulations for importing goods. Also incoming aircrafts or pleasure yachts with the intention to be sold here, don’t qualify for temporary import. Moreover, these new guidelines don’t apply to residents of Aruba. They are simply to pay import duties and with every entry from abroad prove to customs that these import duties are already paid. Those wishing to establish themselves on Aruba have the possibility to import the aircraft or pleasure yacht as moving property, therefore duty-free, but only if the pleasure yacht complies with the conditions stipulated in the Exemption Order.

Our thanks to Mary Stone of MV M.S.Astor for bringing these new rules to noonsite's attention.

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