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By No owner — last modified Oct 16, 2017 04:45 PM

 Suriname - Formalities

Clearance

Enter Suriname through the Suriname river as both Paramaribo and Domburg (upstream) lie on this river.

Enter preferably during daylight, as it can be confusing during the night with the numerous lights.

In addition, there is a dangerous wreck at the entrance which was reported May 2016. See details here.

Fly the 'Q' flag, lower the sails and motor in with the tide.

If waiting for daylight and/or the tide, you can safely anchor at the river mouth, OUT of the shipping lane in 5m of water, and wait.

Whilst all formalities must be completed in the city of Paramaribo, a new government rule does not allow yachts to anchor near the town (unless special permission has been granted), so all visiting yachts must proceed directly up stream to Domburg and travel to Paramaribo from there (only 10nm away).

Approx. 8 miles in, call MAS (Maritime Authority Suriname) on VHF channel 12 or 16, to advise them of your arrival. If nothing heard just proceed to Domburg, past the bridge over the river (height 90 mtr).

Clearance is not required immediately. Once settled in at Domburg, the skipper and crew should attend to clearance formalities in Paramaribo, easily reached by a direct bus link from Domburg. See transport for details on buses between Domburg and Paramaribo.

The skipper and all crew must attend all offices for clearance.

Note: It is sensible to dress reasonably smartly as cruisers have been refused access to the Foreign Police office because they were wearing shorts. Being polite and always greeting an official or person before asking a question will serve you well.

Some marinas will assist with clearance formalities and help with paperwork and organising taxis etc.

Clearing In from Domburg

The day before you plan to head into Paramaribo to clear in, go to Domburg internet shop and make 3 copies of your crew list. Remember, all crew (with their passports) must complete clearance.

Minibuses into town run from 6am to 4pm and it is strongly advised to start early (around 7am). The bus ends up at the Heiligenweg bus stop. Whilst it is possible to take buses to the various offices (see cruiser's report ), it is much simpler to take a taxi from Heiligenweg bus stop to all the various offices you need to visit. Arrange a set price for two hours (cost approx. SDR 40/hour).

Arriving yachts must first check in with:

1. Military Police (MP)
Located on the corner of Tourtonne Laan.
This office will keep one of your crew lists - and may stamp your other crew lists as well (or may not).

2. Immigration Office
Located on the corner of Lim A Po and Watermolenstreet.
This is where you
obtain a 3 month tourist pass. They will keep one of your crew lists as well. Pay at the office directly for a tourist pass, no passport photos needed.

If however you require a visa, you will need to go and pay for this at the bank and bring the receipt back to the Immigration office before the visa will be issued.

3. Return to MP
Who will stamp your passports. Be sure to keep one crew list.

 

Clearing Out

Clearing out requires a visit to the Military Police on the corner of Tourtonne Laan, the same police post you visited when checking in.

When leaving the country, just an exit stamp on your crew list is needed.

Cruisers have reported; "They will ask you when you are leaving. It cannot be further away than "tomorrow" otherwise they will tell you to come back. In practice nobody checks to see that you have actually left".

Last updated June 2017.

Maritime Authority Suriname (MAS)
Cornelis Jongbaw str. #2

Immigration

All passports must be valid for at least 6 months from arrival.

For many nationalities there is no need for a visa in advance. A 3 month tourist pass is obtained on arrival.

Even though the visa is valid for 3 months, you still have to visit the "Vreemdelingen Politie" every month to get your visa stamped.

The following nationalities can now purchase a tourist card (visa) on arrival (see Fees below):
Belgium, Bolivia, Canada, Chile, France, Germany, Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Netherlands, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, USA, Venezuela.

Nationalities not on the above list will require a visa. This can be obtained on arrival, however does require payment at the bank and the receipt brought back to the Foreign Affairs office before the visa will be issued.

Note: If in St Laurent, French Guiana before coming to Suriname, it's possible to get a Tourist Pass for Suriname there (at the Suriname office) which eliminates having to do it here. This makes things easier with just one stop at MAS, and one stop at the Military Police required.

Last updated June 2017.

Immigration Office
Mr. J.Lachmonstraat 166-168, Paramaribo

Customs

Firearms must be declared.

Prohibited imports include: all fruits (except reasonable quantity for personal use imported from the Netherlands), vegetables, plants, roots, bulbs, coffee, cacao, rice, fish, meat and meat products. In practice, these restrictions may not be strictly applied to visiting yachts.

There is no mechanism for bringing in spare or replacement parts duty free.

Last updated June 2017.

Health

Travellers arriving from any country at risk of yellow fever (eg Guyana, French Guiana, Brazil, Venezuela)  are required to show evidence of a yellow fever vaccination.

Malaria prophylaxis is advisable. There is some risk of bilharzia in coastal districts.

Several Hospitals are good and well- equipped in Paramaribo. Several private clinics do exist as well.

Scans/MRI/echo's are all available.

Dentists and any other medical services are good in Suriname.

ZIKA VIRUS ALERT: (September 2016) There have been recent safety alerts from the US State Department, UK Foreign Office, and Center for Disease Control (CDC) regarding travel to parts of Central and South America, Africa, southern Asia, the Caribbean, and the South Pacific islands. Suriname is an area of interest. There is growing concern about the rapid spread of the ZIKA Virus and the impact of the virus on pregnant women and babies. ZIKA is transmitted by mosquitos in tropical and sub-tropical climates, and there is currently no cure or vaccine. This situation is evolving rapidly, so please refer to the CDC’s dedicated website if you are intending to cruise in one of the effected areas.

Updated June 2017.

Fees

In March 2016 the government increased the tourist card price from $25 US to $100 US in an effort to gain much needed foreign currency.

However, there was such an immediate impact on the tourist industry that it was quickly revised to $35 US.

Last updated June 2017.

Restrictions

Military installations must not be photographed.

Wider Caribbean's Marine Protected Areas (CaMPAM)
A useful database of MPAs in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region. All Marine Parks are MPAs, and therefore if wanting to find out about any marine parks in the islands you are visiting, details and location can be sourced via this website.

Pets

Animals must be declared to Customs and have appropriate papers.

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Blackie
Blackie says:
Oct 05, 2017 10:00 PM

The sail across from Ascension Island to the Suriname River mouth took us 25 days – about 2652nm. Crossing in the path of the Amazon River, we were affected by cross currents, even 260nm out. Coming in closer to Suriname, there were a lot of fishing boats with nets extended all over the place and it was very difficult to pick your way though it all, especially at night, so take great care on the approaches or come around at higher latitudes and then turn South heading straight for the entry markers.

We anchored just off the river mouth to wait for a full days light. MAS (Maritime Authority Suriname) would not allow us to anchor closer in, we had to either proceed up to Domburg or wait outside, and so we waited. The current was hectic at 2am so you have to very careful as where to anchor and keep watch.

We arranged docking at Marina Resort Waterland which is about 27nm up the river. GPS – 05deg39’.503N and 055deg03’.833W (see their website www.waterlandsuriname.com and they have a facebook page). Fees were €27 + 8% tax per day with water and electricity. Very nice, relaxing place to recuperate after the long sail.

The owner, Noel, arranged a taxi for us to go into Paramaribo to check in. This took about 6 hours as we needed a visa from Immigration. Visa fee was $45 each and had to be paid at the Central Bank which was a short walk away. Everyone was friendly.

We stayed on dock for 2 weeks then moved 6.7nm back towards Domburg and went on a mooring ball at Harbour Resort Domburg GPS – 05deg42’.222N and 055deg04’.899W. Also very nice with a restaurant (River Breeze Restaurant & Bar), swimming pool, showers and small laundry machine. Fees were €8.75 for the mooring ball. Although while we were there, there was construction working in progress along the bank retaining wall so there was no floating dingy dock and difficult access to land. There was no “water supply” to your boat as part of the facilities/services and the “cooking gas service” entails hiring a car or taxi and going to town yourself.

The Tourism Foundation has a fairly comprehensive tourist destination guide and there is also the Suriname Travel magazine and a variety of smaller brochures/booklets that will assist any visitor to Suriname. These are available at the immigration visa office and Marina Resort Waterland.

SY AKKA
SY AKKA says:
Jun 02, 2017 01:56 PM

Regarding clearing out in Paramaribo, please note that you do not go to Vremdelingenspolitie, but to the Military Police on the corner of Tourtonne Laan, same police post you have been visiting when checking in.
I was told that this is the case since 2 or 3 years already.
Pleas note that sometimes you get your crew list stamped, sometimes not - we did not get a stamp.

Vremdelingenspolitie is still the point to go when you stay longer than 4 weeks and you have to get you 3 months visa re-stamped.

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