Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
The global site for cruising sailors
Sections
You are here: Home / Countries / New Zealand
By No owner — last modified May 13, 2017 02:50 PM

 New Zealand - Formalities

Clearance

Pre-Arrival
Every yacht arriving from overseas must send an NZCS 340: Advance Notice of Arrival (a .doc file of 290 KB available to download from this website) at least 48 hours before you arrive in NZ waters.
You can send the form to:
Email: Yachts@customs.govt.nz
Fax: +64 3 358 0069

You can do this a couple of weeks before, if you wish, with just a rough ETA and then write a short email to change it or your port of entry closer to arrival.

You must also inform Customs and agricultural quarantine officers by VHF radio (Ch. 16), telephone or e-mail (Yachts@customs.govt.nz) of your intended ETA. This must be also done at least 48 hours before arrival.

Russell Radio (see communications, Opua) will inform Customs and Immigration of a boat's arrival if this is requested by radio.

The New Zealand Border Agencies Information Pack for Yachts and Small Craft is available at www.customs.govt.nz and from yacht clubs and marinas around the Pacific. It contains copies of the necessary forms.

NZ "Clean Hull" Policy

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) will be implementing a new standard for biofouling on vessels visiting New Zealand, starting in May 2018. The Craft Risk Management Standard (CRMS) for Biofouling on Vessels Arriving to New Zealand will apply to all vessels arriving in New Zealand from abroad, and stipulates that all vessels must arrive in New Zealand with a “clean hull”. Read this MPI Report for full details.

Arrival Formalities

Once you have entered New Zealand territorial waters (12 nautical miles), the International Q-flag must be clearly displayed.

All craft arriving in New Zealand from overseas must first dock on a Quarantine berth at a Customs port of entry. You must not lay anchor before clearing in.

On approaching the port of entry you should call up Harbour Control on VHF 16 or, Maritime Radio SSB 2182, 4125, 6215, 8291, 12290 or 16420, Tel. +64 9 359 6655 or +64 25 961 375 (after hours) to announce your arrival, or in the case of an offshore emergency. Customs will be informed and you will be directed to the nearest Quarantine dock.

If a yacht is not able to contact the authorities by radio and arrives unannounced, the captain must immediately contact Customs or police by telephone (toll free numbers are available: Whangarei customs 0800 428 786). No one else must go ashore until clearance is complete.

At the quarantine dock, you will be met by Customs and MPI officers. The Customs Officer will do the Immigration work as well. All persons and goods must remain on board until the officers have inspected the craft.

There is both an arrival and departure levy per person which is invoiced by email. See fees section below.

Quarantine / Biosecurity
New Zealand works hard to keep away unwanted pests and diseases entering from their islands. The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI Biosecurity) staff will come aboard and ask you to complete The Masters Declaration form and sign it in their presence. They will inspect the yacht, examine any animals on board, remove the rubbish, look for dirt on any bicycles and sports gear and ask for specific information about the crew, goods aboard and voyage history.

You will be asked to declare all food and 'at risk' goods. See the list of risk goods on The Masters Declaration. The main items are fruit, vegetables, plant products, eggs, pot plants, meat and animal products. Obviously it is advisable to arrive with a minimum of fresh stores which is natural anyway after a week a sea. Often it depends on the origin of the goods so try to keep food sealed in original wrappings. If you are uncertain about anything, declare it!

Risk goods will be removed for destruction by the inspector, unless you request items such as wooden trinkets be treated at your expense and returned to you.

It is not advised to bring pets into New Zealand as the regulations are very extensive. See Pets section below for more details.

Avoid bringing unwanted insects into New Zealand.
The importation of products made from endangered species is prohibited, such as: ivory, tortoise shell, whalebone, coral, crocodile, and lizard or snake skins.
If you have any questions about what you may bring into New Zealand just email vessels@mpi.govt.nz

Mediterranean Fanworm Controls in Northland
If anyone is cruising in the Pacific and planning to spend the cyclone season in NZ, be aware that authorities are trying to control Mediterranean Fanworm in Northland. Be aware that  hulls may be inspected. See Restrictions for further details.

Departure

All craft departing overseas from New Zealand must depart from a Customs port of entry. A Customs officer will attend at the agreed time and place of departure.

You must advise the New Zealand Customs Service at least 72 hours before your intended departure to ensure that there is no delay. Fill out the 5 page of form C2B online, print it and email it to Yachts@customs.govt.nz. together with a photo of the boat.

Once issued with a clearance certificate, yachts are required to go to sea within a reasonable time. Any delay should be reported to Customs, but DO NOT re-send the form.

See this Customs website page for details of the forms required before departure. There is a deparure levy. Currently $3.37/person.

Last updated November 2017.

MPI (Quarantine controls)
Tel:+64 4 894 0100
Detailed information on quarantine inspection and regulations affecting pets on yachts visiting NZ.
MPI Yachts & Recreational Vessels
If you're bringing a yacht or recreational vessel into New Zealand, you need to meet certain rules around biofouling. Find out the requirements and how to meet them.
New Zealand Courtesy Flags and Flag Etiquette
New Zealand Customs Service
Marine Section, Box 29 , Auckland
Tel:+64 (0)9 307 6516 Fax:+64 (0)9 307 6720
Their website link contains all the necessary information and forms for yachts arriving from overseas.

Immigration

Passports must be valid for at least three months beyond departure date.

Visas are not required if both passengers and crew are leaving on the same vessel within 28 days.

Current details of immigration requirements for visitors arriving by yacht are online at www.immigration.govt.nz

Length of Stay
Ordinarily, owners and crew of yachts will be granted a multiple entry visitor visa enabling an initial stay of up to three months.

Owners and crew of super yachts (i.e. yachts over 20m) will be granted a multiple entry visitor visa enabling an initial stay of up to six months.

British citizens may stay for up to six months on a visitor's permit.

Visa Extensions
Visa extensions are possible permitting a total stay in New Zealand of up to nine months. However, it can be easier to apply for up to 9 months visa before you arrive.

In special circumstances you may be granted further visas allowing a total stay in New Zealand of up to twelve months (e.g. if a yacht needs to undergo refitting or major repairs, or yacht crews wish to wait out the South Pacific hurricane season (October to April).

To extend your visa you must complete a 20+ page form and submit it with copies of your bank statements showing that you have the financial means to support yourself whilst in NZ, boat papers, and 2 passport photos.

If you want to stay in NZ for a total of more than 9 months you must have a medical exam and chest x-rays from a New Zealand doctor.

Immigration Requirements
All crew are required to show evidence of funds of $400 NZ per month if living on the yacht.

Anyone leaving the vessel in New Zealand may also be required to show an onward ticket, or sufficient funds to purchase one.

The owner of the yacht must show evidence of owership and of adequate 3rd party insurance.

Immigration Contact Details
To contact an Immigration officer, phone the New Zealand Immigration National Contact Centre on Tel +64 9 914 4100 (09:00-midnight, Mon-Sat).

Last updated November 2017.

New Zealand Immigration
Applying for a visa online.

Customs

Yachts
Yachts and small craft entering New Zealand are technically subject to import clearance charges, Customs duty and goods and services tax (GST). If the craft is owned and operated by a bona fide visitor, however, and is in New Zealand only temporarily, it may be granted a Temporary Import Entry (TIE) – meaning Customs duty and GST charges are deferred. The new maximum duration is now 24 months. For more information about the TIE see Documents below.

The new regulations also permit super-yachts to charter as long as it does not take up more than 65% of its time in New Zealand.

Ships Stores
See www.customs.govt.nz for the rules covering ship's stores regarding alcohol and tobacco.

Yacht Equipment
All equipment other than fixtures must be declared, although these will not be subject to duty if remaining on board and re-exported on departure. Some may have to be sealed by customs. Items to be landed must be declared to customs on arrival. Goods imported into New Zealand such as radios and navigation equipment require a Temporary Import form and a deposit to cover duty and sales tax, which will be refunded on re-export. If imported permanently, they will be subject to duty.

Weapons
Firearms must be declared to customs, and are normally kept in police custody until departure. If there is an onboard safe for firearms, this may be approved by the police.

The importation of weapons such as flick knives, swordsticks, knuckle-dusters, and any weapon designed to give the appearance of another article, is prohibited.

If any firearms were detained on your arrival, contact the New Zealand Police to arrange for them to be delivered to your vessel prior to your departure. Make sure you allow sufficient time for the firearm(s) to be transported to your port of departure, particularly if this is different from your port of arrival.

To contact the New Zealand Police, phone 09 302 6400 between 07:00 and 16:30 Monday to Friday, and ask for the Arms officer.

Medicines
Medicines should be accompanied by a prescription and be kept in their original packing.

Duty-Free Supplies
Purchases made in New Zealand have duty paid on them, but if they are exported a refund of duty can be obtained from customs on proof of purchase and export. Cruisers report that exactly how to carry out this procedure is extremely difficult to find out and many prefer to source parts outside NZ, have a friend group them all together and mail them to NZ as "yacht in transit".

Duty-free supplies vary from port to port. Purchases may be made from a Licensed Export Warehouse before departure, to be delivered just before departure and checked by customs.

A government sales tax of 15% is charged on all goods and services. It can be avoided by yachts in possession of the TIE document, provided the taxable product is affixed permanently to the yacht by the vendor. Especially those having major work done on their boats should make sure that they are not charged this tax. As many non-food items are subject to tax, temporary visitors to New Zealand can claim a refund on all the tax and duty paid on such items which are going to be taken out of the country.

Whilst duty free fuel is heavily promoted for international cruisers in NZ, cruisers report that in fact only one location could provide it - Opua.

The downloadable Yacht Pack contains all the required Customs information and forms.

Biosecurity

Biosecurity is taken very seriously in order to protect New Zealand against imported infections and diseases and there are strict controls in place.

On arrival, a quarantine officer from the MAF, who should be contacted before arrival, carries out an inspection. If that cannot be done, one should telephone MAF on arrival - they accept collect calls - or contact them through the local police. Until clearance is completed, nothing must be landed and the crew must remain on board. After clearance is completed, if it has been necessary to place any provisions under seal or if there are animals on board, regular inspections by an agriculture officer may be carried out.

It may be more convenient to destroy on arrival any provisions that have to be sealed or stores that cannot be landed. Obviously it is advisable to arrive with a minimum of fresh stores.

Items that must not be landed are fruit, vegetables, plant products, foodstuffs, eggs and waste from these items, pot plants, meat and animal products. All waste must be disposed of through the proper garbage disposal system including egg containers. The quarantine officer will explain this on arrival. Until such stores are consumed or destroyed the yacht will be under surveillance and restricted to berthing at a wharf where these garbage facilities are available. Organic garbage should be disposed of before entering New Zealand territorial waters (12 mile limit). The quarantine officer may also inspect for pesticides, which must be of a formula registered in New Zealand. This can include insecticide sprays, cockroach traps and antifouling.

Bicycles, motorcycles and sporting equipment must be washed or cleaned before landing, for which a written authority is required.

The yacht's hull must be clean and well antifouled.

See www.mpi.govt.nz/travel-and-recreation/arriving-in-new-zealand/requirements-for-bringing-your-vessel-to-new-zealand for more details.

Last updated November 2017.

Customs
The Customhouse, 1 Hinemoa Street, Harbour Quays, Wellington 6140
Tel:+64 9 927 8036
Opening hours: 07:00-18:00 (Mon-Fri)
MPI (Quarantine controls)
Tel:+64 4 894 0100
Detailed information on quarantine inspection and regulations affecting pets on yachts visiting NZ.

Health

Any visitors to New Zealand who have symptoms such as a temperature, rash, glandular swelling or jaundice, or who have severe diarrhoea or know of the presence of an infectious disease or symptoms should visit a general practitioner on arrival or if such symptoms arise during their visit.

As exotic mosquitoes are capable of carrying diseases of human health significance MAF inspects all yachts arriving in New Zealand to identify the presence of all life stages of mosquitoes or of potential breeding sites (such as pooled water). Persons on board yachts should be aware of the risk of carrying such insects to New Zealand and keep yachts free of potential mosquito breeding habitat.

Medical Care

Care for international visitors is expensive and difficult to find. Cruisers report that many doctors refuse to see tourists. Prescription drugs are very expensive. Government facilities cost approx. $500 NZD a visit. Private clinics most likely less.

Dental care however is easier to find and much cheaper.

Documents

Temporary Import Entry (TIE)

The TIE gives you a 2-year period in which you can have your vessel in New Zealand tax free. It also gives you a tax break on items you purchase for the vessel.

You will receive this from Customs on entry into NZ. It documents your tax free status. See this Noonsite report for all the details.

Be sure that the name(s) on the TIE (completed by the Customs Agent) reflect everyone connected with the vessel who will make purchases or need to fly out of and back into New Zealand.

Carry a copy of the form in your wallet/purse and provide it to merchants upon request as proof of your tax free status.

An extension beyond 24 months may be granted for emergencies, and such requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Should permission be given, Customs may require a cash deposit or security to cover Customs charges. This will be returned or released, together with interest, provided the vessel leaves within the agreed date.

Note: Be sure to take your TIE with you if flying out of NZ so you can prove you have onward travel out of the country when flying back. You will also need to show your TIE if visiting your local Customs office to clear-in spares and parts from abroad.

Many of the companies that deal primarily with boats, will copy your TIE and have it on record as you continue to make purchases. Other companies where you have work done will need you to provide them a copy each time you make a purchase. Other companies not marine related may well honour the TIE or, if they don't want to deal with the administrative aspect of it, will offer a trade discount on the product in lieu of the TIE tax free status.

Marinas - Electrical Inspection
If you plan to use a marina in NZ you will have to pay to have a yacht electrical inspection. The marina will typically assist you in getting a NZ certified electrician to inspect your shore power outlet and cord. After paying him/her $50-$100 NZD you will get a certificate which can be shown at each marina you visit. Whilst some cruisers report that a few marinas "looked the other way" for international visitors, most do not.

Propane/Butane - Tank Inspections
Before any gas or dive tank bottle will be filled by a service provider, it must be inspected and approved by a New Zealand tank inspector. In a few rare cases in the Auckland area a government permit to have the tank inspected must be secured before you can get your tank inspected. This governmental permit costs around $75 NZD per bottle. Then you take your cylinder to the tank inspector, wait a few days, and pay him about $50 NZD per tank. He/she will stamp a "New Zealand LAB number" on your tank if the bottle is good. You can then take your tank to a gas fill station or dive shop. This applies to every non-New Zealand tank, regardless of condition, age, or origin. Government regulations state that fibreglass tanks cannot be inspected or filled.

Last updated November 2017.

Fees

There is both an arrival and departure levy. Currently totalling $21.57 per person and will be invoiced via an email for payment afterwards.

There is no overtime fees for clearance.

There are fees for visas and extensions to the visitor's permit.

There are also fees for quarantine inspections.

Last updated November 2017.

Restrictions

Mediterranean Fanworm Controls in Northland
All marinas from Marsden Cove to Whangaroa are now insisting that arriving boats that come out of the heavily fanworm infected Auckland waters and sail north, either prove they have had their hulls inspected in the previous month or had anti-foul applied within six months.

Offshore boats may be inspected and questioned in reference to other invasive pests they may be carrying, if their hull looks suspicious from above or a spot inspection with cameras, but the 6 months rule since antifouling does NOT apply to international arrivals.

An interesting cruiser's report on being checked for this pest can be found here.

Marine Environment
Authorities urge all visiting skippers before leaving for NZ to clean their hull of fouling and slime growth, wash down any tenders, fishing gear or diving gear and flush out with fresh water any areas on the yacht that retain seawater.

While in New Zealand don't throw any marine organisms or material overboard that may contain live creatures, weed or even plankton. If you need to clean your hull you are urged to go to a facility that has some means of capturing the fouling material so that exotic organisms are not deposited on the beach or in the sea. It is illegal to clean your hull in the Bay of Islands.

No untreated sewage may be discharged from your boat within 500 metres of the shore, a marine farm or a marine reserve, or in water less than 5 metres in depth.

Chartering
Both the yacht and the crew become liable for New Zealand tax if engaged in chartering. Normally one would have to set up a New Zealand based company through which to charter the yacht or to us a New Zealand based agent. These rules are under review.

Other Restrictions

It is illegal to use marine VHF handheld radios ashore.

The importation of products made from endangered species is prohibited, such as: ivory, tortoise shell, whalebone, coral, crocodile, lizard or snake skins.

Last updated November 2017.

MPI (Quarantine controls)
Tel:+64 4 894 0100
Detailed information on quarantine inspection and regulations affecting pets on yachts visiting NZ.

Pets

New Zealand is a rabies-free country. The New Zealand authorities actively discourage animals arriving on yachts and the restrictions placed on those with animals on board are considerable. Only cats and dogs are permitted and maybe required to spend at least 15 days in a quarantine facility. All the time spent by the MPI officers for compliance and inpections is charged to the owner.

Animals must be either placed in quarantine or securely confined and not landed. 48 hours notice must be given to the MPI before departure from a port, indicating the next port of call in New Zealand, and notification must be given even if only moving moorings.

After six months the animal/s must be reshipped from New Zealand or destroyed; if not the yacht must leave the country. In the event of an animal becoming ill, the MPI must be contacted immediately and private vets cannot be consulted without MPI approval. If a pet dies, its body must be given to the agriculture quarantine officer for disposal

Boats with animals on board may be be inspected every 2 days and the inspector's time is charged to the boat owner. Charges are more expensive at outlying ports such as Opua. Any pets obtained in New Zealand must be added to the bond.

Cats and dogs coming from Australia, United Kingdom, Sweden, Norway, Hawaii,Singapore and the Republic of Ireland do not require quantantine but require a Health Certificate and a Rabies Vaccination Certificate and will be inspected for ticks on arrival. There is a specific "Dogs and Cats on Yachts Import Health Standard" for cats and dogs being brought into New Zealand, and any equipment associated with the animals must also comply with the relevant "Import Health Standard for Equipment Associated with Animals".

Pet Medication - a separate declaration is needed to import veterinary medicines for use on accompanied animals. A copy of the veterinarian's prescription label must be provided with the declaration. However, excessive amounts of veterinary medicines (generally more than 3 months supply) might not be given clearance.

MPI
Office hours 0830-1700.
Tel: +64 4 894 0100.
Email: info@mpi.govt.nz

Read the latest regulations here.

Last updated November 2017.
Share |
vaughncooper
vaughncooper says:
May 12, 2017 05:10 AM

Re. Wet Exhaust Silencers/Water Locks:
Brent at Marine Exhausts Ltd in Auckland was very helpful. We had leaky stainless end caps on our Volvo waterlocks that had reached the end of their life. Brent fabricated entire new fibreglass units that exactly matched our old units for our main engine and generator. The fibreglass option will never pit and corrode as the stainless steel ones did. He completed the job for less than the cost of the new Volvo parts only!
As we have met many cruisers who report the same issue with their waterlocks, I thought I'd put his details here and hopefully it helps someone.
Brent can be contacted on 021-119-3043.

Sailoress
Sailoress says:
Jul 24, 2016 04:09 AM

I spent last cyclone season in Whangarei working on my yacht. Whilst I believe there must be some honest and hardworking contractors I didn't find any. Almost without exception the work was delayed, poor or came in way over quotation. Not a good destination for yachties.

Val Ellis
Val Ellis says:
Sep 28, 2015 09:11 AM

Comment from Noonsite

The 2 years Alan mentions is for the YACHT only, NOT for the crew. See the Immigration section above for the details on visas etc.

Daniel Baydreamer
Daniel Baydreamer says:
Sep 24, 2015 05:19 AM

Alan! I just read your comment regarding the 2 year stay in New Zealand! Were can I find information about this? We were just about to apply for VISA- but after reading your comment maybe this is all for nothing!

//Daniel

kyliep
kyliep says:
Sep 01, 2015 02:17 AM

No fresh produce can be bought into NZ! If the Quarantine officer finds any kind of pests(bugs or anything) in your dry stores, they maybe taken and destroyed, meat rules change as to where you can bring certain goods in from as the authorities re-act to outbreaks of diseases in other countries, therefore rules can change overnight. They often want to check wooden souvenirs especially from the pacific islands for insect damage (or insects themselves) NZ has very few pests and diseases making it's meat and produce some of the best you will ever have! But there are VERY strict rules in place to keep it this way. I know of a person who tried to hide (his salami and cheeses of all things) and almost ended up in prison, but got away with a hefty fine, $12,000NZD I believe. Please declare and ask if you are unsure. From a former Quarantine Inspector-turned-cruiser.

Sue Richards
Sue Richards says:
Oct 29, 2014 12:18 PM

Additional comment from Alan:
Word of caution - no meat can be brought in to NZ, except bacon from Sweden and Finland!!...don’t ask; read the rules, they are very strict.
A French boat ahead of us had two large sacks of probably most of their provisions taken away by quarantine.

Alan
Alan says:
Oct 26, 2014 12:51 AM

Visiting yachts now get an automatic 24 month stay allocated - no extensions, everyone gets 2 years, whether you want it or not !

Alan
Alan says:
Oct 26, 2014 12:53 AM

If you want any SSB work done in Auckland, contact Jaques Calvo, Calvotech,
+64 29 415 0454
www.calvotech.co.nz

Paul tudor-stack
Paul tudor-stack says:
Jul 07, 2014 04:57 AM

Re ICOM radio repairs: If you are having issues with your ICOM HF radio go to anyone in New Zealand but ICOM NZ. I took my 802 to them (as did one other yacht) and the result was they said "we cannot find out what the fault is but it is uneconomical to repair. We recommend you buy a new one". In addition they charged several hundred dollars for their failed efforts. You'd be throwing your money away.

New Zealand
North Island
Off-lying Islands
South Island
Profile
Facts
Security
Weather
Main Ports
Formalities
Clearance
Immigration
Customs
Health
Documents
Fees
Restrictions
Local Customs
Clearance Agents
Pets
General Info
Time Zone
Yachting Essentials
Opening Hours
Money
Communications
Transport
Diplomatic Missions
Events
Emergencies
Publications
Links
Update History
Countries
Albania
Algeria
American Samoa
Angola
Anguilla
Antarctica
Antigua & Barbuda
Argentina
Aruba
Ascension Island
Australia
Azores
BIOT (Chagos)
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belgium
Belize
Bermuda
Bonaire
Bosnia
Bouvetoya
Brazil
British Virgin Islands
Brunei
Bulgaria
Cambodia
Canada
Canary Islands
Cape Verdes
Cayman Islands
Channel Islands
Chile
China
Christmas Island
Cocos Keeling
Colombia
Comoros
Cook Islands
Costa Rica
Croatia
Cuba
Curacao
Cyprus
Denmark
Djibouti
Dominica
Dominican Republic
East Timor (Timor Leste)
Easter Island
Ecuador
Egypt
El Salvador
Eritrea
Estonia
Falkland Islands
Faroe Islands
Federated States of Micronesia
Fiji
Finland
France
French Guiana
French Polynesia
French Subantarctic Territory
Galapagos
Gambia
Georgia
Germany
Gibraltar
Greece
Greenland
Grenada
Guadeloupe
Guam
Guatemala
Guinea-Bissau
Guyana
Haiti
Hawaii
Heard, McDonald & Macquarie Islands
Honduras
Hong Kong
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Ivory Coast
Jamaica
Japan
Jordan
Juan Fernandez Islands
Kenya
Kiribati
Kuwait
Latvia
Lebanon
Libya
Lithuania
Macau
Madagascar
Madeira
Malaysia
Maldives
Malta
Marion & Prince Edward Island
Marshall Islands
Martinique
Mauritania
Mauritius
Mayotte
Mexico
Monaco
Montenegro
Montserrat
Morocco
Mozambique
Myanmar (Burma)
Namibia
Nauru
Netherlands
New Caledonia
New Zealand
New Zealand's Subantarctic Islands
Nicaragua
Niue
Norfolk Island
Northern Marianas
Norway
Oman
Palau (Belau)
Panama
Papua New Guinea
Peru
Philippines
Pitcairn Island
Poland
Portugal
Puerto Rico
Qatar
Reunion Island
Romania
Russia
Saba
Samoa
Sao Tome and Principe
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Sint Maarten
Slovenia
Solomon Islands
Somalia
South Africa
South Georgia & South Sandwich Islands
South Korea
Spain
Spanish Virgin Islands
Sri Lanka
St Barts
St Helena
St Kitts & Nevis
St Lucia
St Martin
St Pierre & Miquelon
St Vincent & the Grenadines
Statia
Subantarctic & Southern Ocean Islands
Sudan
Suriname
Sweden
Syria
Taiwan
Tanzania
Thailand
Tokelau
Tonga
Trinidad & Tobago
Tristan da Cunha
Tunisia
Turkey
Turks & Caicos
Tuvalu
US Virgin Islands
USA
Ukraine
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
Uruguay
Vanuatu
Venezuela
Vietnam
Wallis and Futuna
Yemen
Add/Update Your Business
If you would like your business to be listed, or the details are wrong, please update your business
Platinum Sponsors
Related Reports
New Zealand: Useful Information on Tax Free Breaks

New Zealand: Useful Information on Tax Free Breaks (18 Nov 2017)

Bay of Islands, Opua: Recommendations from Cruisers

Bay of Islands, Opua: Recommendations from Cruisers (24 Mar 2017)

Report Icon

NZ Temporary Import Entry (TIE) document: Read this before getting one (24 Mar 2017)

Report Icon

The Pacific Crossing Guide - 3rd Edition (17 Oct 2016)

SV JOANA’S Refit Experiences in North Island NZ (November 2015 to September 2016)

SV JOANA’S Refit Experiences in North Island NZ (November 2015 to September 2016) (16 Oct 2016)

Report Icon

Pacific - List of Radio Nets (17 Apr 2016)

Report Icon

Clearance Formalities Worldwide: How Experiences Vary (12 Oct 2015)

Passage Planning: From the SW Pacific to NZ

Passage Planning: From the SW Pacific to NZ (02 Oct 2015)

North Island, Whangarei: Reports from Cruisers

North Island, Whangarei: Reports from Cruisers (06 Mar 2015)

South Pacific Cruising Notes: April to November 2013

South Pacific Cruising Notes: April to November 2013 (21 Oct 2014)

Reflections on Antipodean Cruising

Reflections on Antipodean Cruising (21 Oct 2014)

Report Icon

Tropical South Pacific weather resources (17 Mar 2014)

Is Satellite Imagery The Future Of Search-And-Rescue Operations?

Is Satellite Imagery The Future Of Search-And-Rescue Operations? (26 Nov 2013)

New Zealand Weather Helper

New Zealand Weather Helper (25 Jul 2013)

Report Icon

Pacific Cyclone Season: North instead of South (03 Jul 2013)

New Zealand, Auckland: An Update on Zodiac Liferaft Servicing in Auckland

New Zealand, Auckland: An Update on Zodiac Liferaft Servicing in Auckland (31 May 2013)

Report Icon

Pacific Planning Advice (26 Mar 2013)

Report Icon

Word of Caution if you plan to fly out of NZ (28 Jan 2013)

Report Icon

New Zealand Logistics - A Five Month Visit (10 Sep 2012)

Report Icon

French Polynesia: Be Aware the Required Bond does NOT Cover All Situations (04 Aug 2012)

Report Icon

A Circumnavigation of New Zealand - Summer 2012 (05 Jul 2012)

Report Icon

Opua: ICA Free Rallies for New Pacific Arrivals (19 Jun 2012)

Report Icon

Proof of Competency for European Countries (04 Nov 2011)

Report Icon

Dog clearance sailing NZ to Australia (27 Jun 2011)

Report Icon

South Pacific Ocean Passage Planning (25 May 2011)

Report Icon

Antarctic Deaths - Enormous Ramifications (21 May 2011)

Report Icon

A Destination Guide for Yachts Visiting New Zealand (18 Feb 2011)

Report Icon

Yacht Abandoned off New Zealand (21 Jul 2010)

Report Icon

Book Review - Cruising Japan to New Zealand (03 Jun 2010)

Report Icon

NEW DVD - Reach for the Sea (New Zealand) (03 Jun 2010)

Report Icon

NZ as Cyclone Season Destination (20 May 2009)

Report Icon

New Caledonia to NZ then on to Alaska (15 Apr 2009)

Report Icon

Seattle to New Zealand - More comments added (23 Feb 2009)

Report Icon

Queensland to New Zealand (12 Jan 2009)

Report Icon

French Polynesia to NZ - the logical route (11 Dec 2008)

Report Icon

Fiji to New Zealand (16 Jul 2008)

Report Icon

Boaties inject $25m in to NZ's Northland (09 Jul 2008)

Report Icon

Change to Import Duties for Cruisers Staying in NZ (04 Jul 2008)

Report Icon

Chile to New Zealand (22 May 2008)

Report Icon

Australia and New Zealand during the summer months (22 May 2008)

Report Icon

New Zealand - Getting work done on your boat (27 Mar 2008)

Report Icon

New Marina in Whangarei Habour (26 Jan 2008)

Report Icon

Tide Information In South Pacific (17 Oct 2007)

Report Icon

Summary of refit season in Westhaven, Auckland (02 Apr 2007)

Report Icon

Information on Tascoast Radio (15 Jan 2007)

Report Icon

Weather Forecast Services for South Pacific (24 Jan 2006)

Report Icon

Nelson Facilities (07 Aug 2005)

Report Icon

Recommendations At Gulf Harbour Marina, Whangaparoa (25 Apr 2005)

Report Icon

Cruisers Report On New Zealand Now Available Online (21 Feb 2005)

Report Icon

25th Anniversary of Moon Handbooks South Pacific (24 Jun 2004)

Report Icon

Marinas in and around Auckland (25 May 2004)

Report Icon

Spending the Cyclone Season in New Zealand (15 Oct 2003)

Report Icon

New Zealand Weather (19 Aug 2002)

Related News
New Zealand: New Biofouling Requirements for 2018

New Zealand: New Biofouling Requirements for 2018  (07 Dec 2017)

Tropical Cyclone Donna lashes Vanuatu and New Caledonia

Tropical Cyclone Donna lashes Vanuatu and New Caledonia  (08 May 2017)

NZ, Chatham Islands: Solo Polish Yachtsman Rescued

NZ, Chatham Islands: Solo Polish Yachtsman Rescued  (19 Apr 2017)

South Pacific: Category three Cyclone Cook hits New Caledonia

South Pacific: Category three Cyclone Cook hits New Caledonia  (09 Apr 2017)

NZ to Australia: Sailors rescued in rough seas off Sydney

NZ to Australia: Sailors rescued in rough seas off Sydney  (09 Mar 2017)

New Zealand death and MOB double tragedy on 65-footer Platino

New Zealand death and MOB double tragedy on 65-footer Platino  (14 Jun 2016)

Fiji Bound: Sea Mercy Recovery Fleet Poised to Sail from New Zealand

Fiji Bound: Sea Mercy Recovery Fleet Poised to Sail from New Zealand  (19 May 2016)

Pacific, Fiji: Sea Mercy Recovery Fleet Plan Update

Pacific, Fiji: Sea Mercy Recovery Fleet Plan Update  (17 Apr 2016)

Fiji: Sea Mercy's Work in the Pacific in response to Cyclone Winston

Fiji: Sea Mercy's Work in the Pacific in response to Cyclone Winston  (29 Feb 2016)

Pacific Tropical Cyclone Season Fast Approaching

Pacific Tropical Cyclone Season Fast Approaching  (15 Oct 2015)

Report Icon

NZDF to the aid of a yacht in the north Tasman  (10 Sep 2015)

New Zealand, Northland: Tightening up of restrictions for new arrivals following the discovery of a highly invasive marine pest

New Zealand, Northland: Tightening up of restrictions for new arrivals following the discovery of a highly invasive marine pest  (06 Sep 2015)

Report Icon

Mexico to New Zealand: Fire on Passage - Sailors Rescued  (01 Jul 2015)

Solomon Islands & North Vanuatu: OceansWatch to aid Cyclone Pam victims

Solomon Islands & North Vanuatu: OceansWatch to aid Cyclone Pam victims  (14 Apr 2015)

Report Icon

New Zealand: French cruisers fined $3000 for concealing pate on board  (06 Mar 2015)

Report Icon

New Zealand, Opua: MPI to consider charges for two yachties over concealed fruit  (13 Dec 2014)

Report Icon

Australia to New Zealand: Four planes and a container ship rescue yacht  (14 Sep 2014)

Report Icon

South Pacific, Cook Islands: Swedish couple rescued from dismasted yacht  (09 Aug 2014)

New Zealand: Violent Winter Storm pummels Northern New Zealand damaging and sinking 30 yachts

New Zealand: Violent Winter Storm pummels Northern New Zealand damaging and sinking 30 yachts  (16 Jul 2014)

Fiji to New Zealand: J/111 Django abandoned due to rudder stock failure

Fiji to New Zealand: J/111 Django abandoned due to rudder stock failure  (08 Jul 2014)

Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia to Sydney: Pacific Climate Warriors calling all sailboats

Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia to Sydney: Pacific Climate Warriors calling all sailboats  (12 May 2014)

South Pacific, Vanuatu: OceansWatch Projects this year

South Pacific, Vanuatu: OceansWatch Projects this year  (08 May 2014)

New Zealand: Missing yacht debris washes ashore

New Zealand: Missing yacht debris washes ashore  (06 May 2014)

New Zealand: No Sight of Missing Yacht or its Crew

New Zealand: No Sight of Missing Yacht or its Crew  (27 Apr 2014)

Canadian sailor rescued from sinking yacht in the South Pacific

Canadian sailor rescued from sinking yacht in the South Pacific  (14 Apr 2014)

Timor Sea, 80nm from Darwin: Sunken yacht discovered by trawler

Timor Sea, 80nm from Darwin: Sunken yacht discovered by trawler  (27 Mar 2014)

New Zealand: Entry period extended for visiting yachts

New Zealand: Entry period extended for visiting yachts  (12 Dec 2013)

Vanuatu to Australia Rally identified as favourite for drug cartel

Vanuatu to Australia Rally identified as favourite for drug cartel   (06 Dec 2013)

Southern Indian Ocean: Missing sailor Eddie Anker now presumed lost

Southern Indian Ocean: Missing sailor Eddie Anker now presumed lost  (29 Sep 2013)

Tasman Sea: Searchers for yacht Nina find a new satellite image

Tasman Sea: Searchers for yacht Nina find a new satellite image  (12 Sep 2013)

New Zealand: Marine Industry Association publish new destination guide

New Zealand: Marine Industry Association publish new destination guide  (30 Aug 2013)

South Pacific: Dates confirmed for the NZ 2 OZ Rally

South Pacific: Dates confirmed for the NZ 2 OZ Rally  (26 Aug 2013)

Sail 2 Indonesia: New Rally by the Island Cruising Association for 2014

Sail 2 Indonesia: New Rally by the Island Cruising Association for 2014  (09 Jul 2013)

Tasman Sea: Family plead for missing schooner search to continue

Tasman Sea: Family plead for missing schooner search to continue  (01 Jul 2013)

Solomon Islands: Provincial Government registers Marine Protected Area

Solomon Islands: Provincial Government registers Marine Protected Area  (11 Jun 2013)

Great New Service for noonsite users: Get notified of cruising news, reports and country updates as they are posted

Great New Service for noonsite users: Get notified of cruising news, reports and country updates as they are posted  (23 May 2013)

OceansWatch: First yacht to leave for 2013 Expedition - you can still help

OceansWatch: First yacht to leave for 2013 Expedition - you can still help  (18 May 2013)

June 8th is World Oceans Day: Create or Join an event near you

June 8th is World Oceans Day: Create or Join an event near you  (17 May 2013)

South Pacific, New Zealand: Russell Radio Discontinues SSB Service

South Pacific, New Zealand: Russell Radio Discontinues SSB Service  (07 May 2013)

Report Icon

Tonga: Couple who Survived a Severe Storm Hoping to Find Their Abandoned Yacht  (23 Nov 2012)

Report Icon

Tonga: Cruising couple rescued after surviving a knock-down and being stranded for two days in 50mph winds  (09 Nov 2012)

Report Icon

Pumice Raft the size of Belgium floating off New Zealand  (11 Aug 2012)

Report Icon

Tonga: Australian Yacht Wrecked and Crew Missing - Search Suspended  (21 Jun 2012)

Report Icon

Venezuela: New Zealand Yacht Lost on Reef  (08 Mar 2012)

Report Icon

Some Good News Regarding the International Certificate of Competence  (07 Mar 2012)

Report Icon

New Zealand: Rena Disaster - Ship breaks up in storm  (09 Jan 2012)

Report Icon

New Zealand: Rena Disaster - Further Updates  (19 Oct 2011)

Report Icon

Pacific: Minerva Reef - Sailors Warned Away  (17 Jun 2011)

Report Icon

ICC now available to NZ Citizens   (10 Mar 2011)

Report Icon

Trouble in Paradise  (11 Feb 2011)

Report Icon

South Pacific: Four rescued, yacht abandoned southwest of Fiji   (12 Nov 2010)

Report Icon

Sailing NZ to Vanuatu? You can help Project VEO  (04 May 2010)

Report Icon

New Zealand - Missing Sailor  (30 Mar 2010)

Report Icon

Swiss solo sailor successfully rescued after whale strike  (26 Nov 2009)

Report Icon

Cook Islands - Skipper and dog survive yacht sinking  (14 Oct 2009)

Report Icon

New "Flavour" of El Nino under Global Warming  (01 Oct 2009)

Report Icon

Yacht Express Makes Debut Down Under  (18 Jul 2008)

Report Icon

New Zealand Authorities Want Explanations  (07 Dec 2007)

Report Icon

Australian Customs Impose Tough New Notification Rule  (22 Mar 2007)