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By No owner — last modified Jul 14, 2017 11:20 AM

 Brunei - Formalities

Clearance

Whilst Kuala Belait may be the closest Port of Entry into Brunei if coming from Malaysia, the depth over the bar at the entrance to the port is limited and therefore will not be available to all yachts.

Port Control should be contacted on VHF Channel 16 on approach. The normal procedure is to visit the Port Authority Office first, followed by Immigration, then Customs.

The Port Authority will want to see your previous port clearance etc. You will need to fill in arrival documents and give a copy of your crew list. The officer will tell you how much your light dues will be upon leaving, and will give you the outward clearance documents for completion prior to clearing out.

Customs will want a Cargo Manifest, which can just say "nil", and a crew list.

Last updated July 2017.

Immigration

Passports must have a validity of at least 6 months.

Citizens of most countries will be granted a visa on arrival for periods of between 14 and 90 days. See Brunei Government website for a detailed list.

Nationals of Australia are now granted a visa on arrival for a period of 30 days, as are those of New Zealand. Citizens of the European Union are granted 90 days as are those of the USA, but Canadians only have 14 days.

All foreign nationals will require a visa if they plan to stay longer that that which granted by their Visa On Arrival.

Proof of sufficient funds may be required.

Nationalities requiring a visa in advance, can obtain one from a Brunei embassy or consulate.

Nationals from countries requiring a visa and arriving without one will receive a 72 hour Transit Pass. A transit pass requires that you are moving from one place to another via Brunei. A Transit Pass will not be issued if you intend returning to the place you arrived from.

It is possible to apply for a Visitor's Pass or Transit Pass extension at Brunei Immigration once admitted to Brunei.

Nationals from Israel, Egypt, Iran, Russia, Pakinstan, Myanmar, Tajikistan and Ukraine have to apply in advance for a social Visa  and are likely to be interviewed.

Information on Brunei Embassies and High Commissions can be found at Brunei Missions Abroad

Last updated July 2017.

Customs

Brunei Customs Authorities enforce strict regulations concerning the temporary import or export of items such as firearms, religious materials and alcohol.

Firearms should be declared to Customs or police.

Alcohol must be declared to Customs on arrival. A non Muslim over 17 years of age may bring in not more than two bottles of liquor (about 2 litres) and twelve cans of beer for personal consumption. There are no alcohol sales or outlets in Brunei. Be sure to fill in the yellow import forms and keep them.

Consumption of alcohol in private, on one's yacht, at a private home or party, in a hotel room etc, is acceptable; but one should not make a display of it on public streets. Alcohol can also be taken to the Yacht Clubs for your own consumption there.

Last updatedJuly 2017.

Fees

Single Entry Visa: B$15.00
Multiple Entry: B$20.00.

Local Customs

Brunei is officially a Muslim country. The version of Islam practiced in Brunei is open, family oriented, respectful of alternate religions, and tolerant of international pluralism. Brunei is a modern country with an international outlook. One should however observe local customs and religious practices by not accentuating or abusing the differences between Moslem and non Moslem practices, dress etc.

Alcohol must not be consumed in public. Smoking is discouraged.

Moslems in Brunei dress conservatively, and many Moslem women wear a head scarf in public, at government offices etc. Non-Moslem women are not required to wear a head scarf or big baggy clothes.

Shopping centres and public places reflect the multi-ethnic and international perspective of Brunei. It is rare to see Moslem men in shorts. Moslem women wear brightly coloured outfits that cover most skin, and probably a head scarf. Many people will be in short and/or tight skirts, jeans and the usual clothing that follows international fashion trends.

When visiting government offices for immigration, customs etc, conservative dress is respectful. Loose fitting long pants and shirts for men or long skirts/pants for women is the standard.

Pets

An import licence, obtained prior to arrival from the Agricultural Department, is required for all animals and birds.

Cats and dogs must be accompanied by an additional veterinarian good health certificate issued at point of origin, together with anti-rabies inoculation certificate stating that the animal was vaccinated 60 days at the latest prior to arrival.

A quarantine period of 180 days is applicable to all cats and dogs imported from countries other than Australia, Ireland (Rep. of), New Zealand, Sabah, Sarawak, Singapore and the United Kingdom.

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AllanR
AllanR says:
Jul 13, 2017 05:22 AM

Present construction of the three bridges in Brunei involves a lot of foreign flagged support boats etc, which all need diesel and which take petrol etc to the water based construction sites. They normally have all the fuel from that riverine filling station pre-booked. And because they are foreign flagged the filling station is charging the international price. It is still possible to get diesel from vehicle filling stations. Contact us for details.

Allan Riches
Brunei Bay Radio - radio@bruneibay.net

bbalan
bbalan says:
Feb 20, 2016 05:07 AM

INCREASE IN FUEL PRICES:

As of December 2015, the Shell fuel dock in Brunei (up the river from Muara) is charging foreign yachts and additional BND$1 / liter. This is a 500% increase in the price they were charging just a month before.

Bruce
s/v Migration

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